Diffusion of Innovations Curve

The construction industry is going through a lot of changes.

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The pace of change won’t slow down in the near future and no one can predict exactly what all those changes will be.  The contractors that dominate tomorrow’s market will be those that have built strong capabilities for identifying opportunities or problems then rapidly making lasting changes throughout the organization.

Leadership Tools: Diffusion of Innovation Curve. Book: Crossing the Chasm by Geoffrey Moore.

It is worth studying the “Diffusion of Innovations” theory which explores how, why, and at what rate new ideas and technology spread. 

Basically any group is broken up into five broad categories:

  1. Innovators (2.5%):  They seek out and eat change for breakfast!  Sometimes too frequently.
  2. Early Adopters (13.5%):  They will catch on very quickly; not much to worry about except they will be frustrated by the adoption rate of the rest of the group.  
  3. Early Majority (34%):  This is where you start to build critical mass and if you can’t get to this group then any lasting change will fail.  Gordon Moore calls this “Crossing the Chasm” between Early Adopters and Early Majority - harder than it seems but critical.  
  4. Late Majority (34%):  Very pragmatic group - will only change when it is well proven by others. 
  5. Laggards (16%):  Won’t change until forced to.  

What are the 3 most important changes you need to make in your company?  

Have you mapped out where the people involved fall on the curve? 




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