Top Performers Asking Questions

Top performers are always actively reaching out to meet new people.

D. Brown Management Profile Picture
Share
Leadership Tools: Top Performers are Always Asking Questions. Weaker performers believe they have all the answers.

Top performers are constantly asking others questions.  

Top performers have daily habits where they work to acquire new knowledge.  

Top performers relentlessly practice and experiment with things they learn, combining the new and the old into something unique.

Top performers know that over 95% of this is total waste.  

Top performers also know that the return on the 5% of new relationships they develop and knowledge they gain have a 100X or better return.  

Top performers know that sometimes those returns aren’t obvious for years or even decades.  

Top performers know that if they spend too much time trying to determine if something is a waste or not, they will never get started. They know it is better to aggressively learn and experiment and then scale-up when appropriate.  


Weaker performers have the hubris to believe they know enough already and can’t learn anything from anyone else.  

Weaker performers are discouraged when they try something new and it doesn’t work.  


TJ Kastning is an example of a top performer always seeking to sharpen his skills. 

Who is someone new you have reached out to this week to sharpen your skills? How many this year?




Balancing Training and Coaching Effectively
Every contracting business is made up of many jobs that need to be done, ranging from relatively simple and short-term tasks to complex, ambiguous, and long-term objectives.
Lean Principle - 2 Second Lean and Paul Akers
2 Second Lean heavily resonates with the crafts people and field supervisors in construction companies. It is a great tool to use to start changing your culture and making major improvements to your entire value stream and improving productivity.
10 Jugs of Wine - A Tale from Japan
Diffusion of personal responsibility can occur quickly on teams. Everyone must contribute. This is a simple tale from Japan that elegantly illustrates the point and includes how people react even when the failed results are clear.