ABC Daily Planning

Effective planning processes create the foundation for great production.

D. Brown Management Profile Picture
Share

The planning process can be seen as a series of tighter and tighter concentric circles with the bullseye being the daily plan.  When the feedback and learning cycles are tightened up to a daily habit productivity improvements accelerate.  

Field Productivity: The ABC's of Daily Planning

Think about productivity the same as filling a jar with rocks, gravel and sand.  You have to put your big rocks in first and by doing that you can pack in a lot more gravel and sand.  Each work day is your “jar” and your tasks are your rocks. Consider them this way:

  • A - The biggest and most critical tasks to get accomplished.  
  • B - Backup larger tasks that can be completed just in case something happens with your ‘A’ tasks.  No matter how perfect your planning and preparation there are always things that can go wrong and the faster your crew can swing over to ‘Plan B’ the less impact you will have to productivity.  
  • C - The work day rarely aligns perfectly with completion of your major tasks.  C-level items are like the gravel and the sand in the jar. They are small punch-as-you-go items, pre-assembly or layout tasks that can be used to fill in those 15-60 minute production holes that often get filled with busy work.  

When planning the day make sure the 6 Pillars of Productivity are met leveraging your Site Logistics Manager if applicable. 

At the end of each day identify what got completed, what was impacted, why and how to improve the next day. 


Labor Productivity
Field labor is the often the biggest variable on a construction project - making it the biggest risk and opportunity....

Related Training
Labor Productivity
Field labor is the often the biggest variable on a construction project - making it the biggest risk and opportunity....

Field Productivity - The Improvement Pyramid
An improvement of a few minutes per day to actual installation time compounded monthly is worth about $800K per year for a $25M contractor. What is it worth to you? Improvements to field productivity can be viewed as 4 major stages of a pyramid
Planning - Integrating the 4 Key Responsibilities
Effective planning combined with regular feedback (at least weekly) combined with a structured look at how to improve each week is the key to integrating the four key responsibilities of a Foreman.
A Broader Definition of a Change on a Construction Project
The first step for contractors improving their management of changes on a project is simply earlier identification. This requires a better definition of what a change really is.