Business Development Defined

Nothing will have a bigger impact on a contractor’s business than a constant flow of high quality work with a select group of customers.

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A contractor’s growth will truly accelerate when they separate out business development responsibilities from owners, estimating, and operations. 

Business Development Defined: Six Critical Stages to Winning Profitable Work.

Building an aggressive and scalable business development process is one of the best guarantees of success in both a growing and a declining market.  

With so much upside, why aren’t more contractors being successful when adding dedicated business developers to their organizational structures? 

This is something we spend a lot of time on with clients and the single biggest challenge we see is the failure to define the role clearly. The role of an owner or executive doing business development is completely different than the role of a dedicated business developer. Separating out these roles requires breaking down the entire work acquisition process into six major phases, along with a clear understanding that business development is: 

The process of creating new business opportunities through targeted networking, education, and awareness-building activities. 


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